5 Ways to Rebuild the African-American Community

The African-American community is supposed to be a team, but lately this team hasn’t been working together the way it should. It’s not a wholesome team where everyone has each other’s backs, instead it’s an accidental rivalry. It could be because we do not see value in ourselves. But, this cannot be solely blamed on the African-American community. This could be blamed on the media because they always show the problems in our community, but never any solutions. So, here are a few ways to redeem our community.

1. Support Black-Owned Businesses

Black-owned businesses are a dime a dozen. As a community, we should buy black to support other black people. Black people tend to use the excuse of “bad service” as a reason not to support black-owned businesses. The reality of this complaint is that these same black people can experience equally bad or worse service at other stores that are owned by white people. The black dollar can be very powerful if it is used properly. When we buy white, then we push money into the white community, which in turn makes more jobs for other white people instead of creating more jobs for black people. Black-owned businesses are more likely to hire other black people, support black people, and give back to the community. If we do not put our black dollar back into our black community, then how will we rebuild our black communities to be bigger and better?

2. Utilize Black Entertainment

Historically, African-American shows have always taught us lessons more inclined towards being black. It was shows like A Different World that actually depicted black people going to college and The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air that revealed police brutality towards black people. There was a time when we could self-identify with the people we see on the television in a positive manner. These black shows were more than just entertainment. They held moral lessons that helped the youth of our community, and whoever else that watched it, see that being black isn’t about being demoralized.

Black literature has always carried burdens of centuries of pain, but that isn’t the only kind of literature that black people write. The problem is that this seems to be the only kind of black literature that is acknowledged. To know our burdens could never be a bad thing, but to only know our burdens has to take a toll. It seems like black youth are never given anything positive to relate to whether it’s media related or in literature. Utilize black entertainment as an escape from a world that is set to tear us down.

3. Educate Yourself

Education doesn’t have to be done at school. Not only should we educate ourselves on the problems in the community, but we should also learn about our past and not just the things we are taught to believe in school. Black people have a rich history, and it’s not being taught to us in schools. There are many possible solutions in the form of protest movements that can not only educate you more, but help fight for the black community. Not only should we be educated about our history and possible solutions, but we should also learn about handling our money. As a community, we should be more financially literate. The black dollar stays in the black community for all of six hours, and we spend specifically less money on healthcare and pensions than other communities do. Education is a must if we want to rebuild our community.

4. Outreach Programs

Outreach programs are vital in communities where violence is rampant. Outreach programs can provide a safe space for black youth. These outreach programs can even have counselors, tutors, and possibly provide food to these at-risk youth who may not have access to any of these services otherwise. These outreach programs give these youths the option of staying out of the violence that may be rampant in their communities.

5. Support the Community

The black community needs more unity. The men of our community tear down fellow black women, and they act as if their mother isn’t a black woman. Black women do the same with black men. This is a problem. We don’t support each other in the community. We instead we tear each other down to make them feel worthless. We do not support the black community as a whole.

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Kelisha Trice

Kelisha Trice is a student at North Carolina A&T State University majoring in English with a concentration in African American Literature.

Kelisha Trice

Kelisha Trice is a student at North Carolina A&T State University majoring in English with a concentration in African American Literature.

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